How’s Your Aging Self? Part I of a Deep View on Insightful Aging

With a view on bolstering such good thoughts, I recently read Thomas Moore’s newest book, Ageless Soul: Living a Full Life with Joy and Purpose. I’ve always been a big fan of Moore, who is currently 77 years of age. Two of his books I have read repeatedly, among more than 20 he authored over the years, are A Life at Work, and Care of the Soul, which was a 44-week NY Times best-seller back in the early 1990s, and still resonates today. I also enjoyed A Religion of One’s Own, his previous book, published in 2015.

How’s Your Aging Self? Part II:  What I’m Learning through My Autodidactic Studies on Aging

As I push myself through this study on aging, I’ve arrived at a point of having to more thoroughly review the research and attempt to synthesize the most salient nuggets of information I have thus far highlighted either electronically on my Kindle, or by underlining in pen, or by swiping across with various-colored highlighters in the many hard-cover and paperback books I own.

The Ninety-Year Plan

If you estimate you will inhabit the Earth until you reach into your ninetieth year, you can use an obvious baseball metaphor to represent your aging life. At 60 you are in the sixth inning of a nine-inning game, and you are – congratulations – manager of the home team. With 60 being the first decade of the final third of the game, reaching that milestone, in my opinion, means you can officially be called “old.”

The Economics of Soul vs. a Job in Old Age

While I have always been a highly introspective person, I never thought my introspection would grow more prominently into old age. I assumed (never assume) that by now – at 64 – I would have it all figured out and there would be less of a need to be looking inward and more of a desire to increasingly play cards with other people near or in retirement. Boy was I wrong!

The Abundance of Aging

The so-called “longevity revolution” drives the next phases of Baby Boomer life, as they reach into their elder years. In short, we are still around and will stay around much longer than our predecessor generations. Plus, there are a lot of us, some 78 to 80 million by most estimates.

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